Posted in classes, Quilting, Studio 180 Design tools and techniques, Sue Pelland Designs tools and techniques, Teaching

Top 8 Reasons to take a quilt class!

  1.  Most obvious – learn a new skill.  Whether its a new tool, new technique, or new pattern, taking a class is a great way to learn. Your teacher is an expert in class content and can explain to you in a way you can understand.  We all learn a little differently and a good instructor will be able to help you understand the concept.
  2. Refresh or perfect a skill.  If it’s been a while since you’ve quilted or you’re struggling with a tool or technique a class is a great way to get “back in the saddle”.
  3. It’s the little things. In class you may learn a new way to pin, perfect your quarter inch or learn to spin your seams..
  4. You’ll be encouraged to change your rotary cutter blade.  None of us change it often enough – go change your blade right now!  You will thank me!
  5. You’ll “need” to buy new fabric – like you need a reason!  Of course you can use something out of your stash – but that new fabric line would be perfect!
  6. In class you’ll get to see the fabric combinations of all the other students.  I’m always amazed by the different styles and colors chosen for projects.  And inspired!
  7. Sometimes there is Show and Tell – more inspiration!
  8. Make new friends, hang out with other quilters, share ideas and laugh!

Do you take quilt classes?  What would you add to the list?

Posted in Quilting, vintage quilts

More vintage fun!

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Another vintage top finished!  I added muslin borders to make it bigger and quilted with a simple butterfly meander.

jean-hoy-2The butterflies are all done by hand.  Look at the details in the stitches – especially that Blanket Stitch!  Amazing art!

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It’s always a privilege for me to finish these vintage tops.  Most have been “safely” tucked away and no one gets to enjoy the art from the past.

Years ago I would cringed when one was brought to me – Should I quilt this?  Is it valuable?  Will machine quilting lessen the value?  Will the “quilt police” show up?  Can they be quilted by machine?  I had lots of questions and the only answer seemed to be -NO – never machine quilt vintage quilts!

Never being one to take NO for an answer I’ve quilted many vintage tops over the years.  And many who’ve had those quilt tops tucked away are now able to use, display and enjoy some family treasures.

Do you have some quilts or quilt tops tucked away?

 

Posted in Quilt Stories, Quilting, vintage quilts

Gertrude’s Quilt

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I had the pleasure of quilting this quilt last week.  My friend Honey brought it in – what a treasure – all hand pieced ( and a little wonky)!  She told me her great grandmother made it and she’s kept it in her cedar chest for years.  I wish I had taken a before picture as it wasn’t even close to square.  Kind of parallelogram shaped would be more accurate.  I trimmed the edges ( no binding around hexies for this girl) and squared it up as much as I could.  The fabric in this quilt is pristine; no stains, no discoloration and no fading.

Quilting was a challenge.  I used spray starch and steam to tame those “fuller” areas. We decided on a simple loopy meander – made it easier to work in the extra fabric.

Honey picked up her quilt today and she loved it!  She had done some research on her great-grandmother.  Her name is Gertrude Amheiser from Juniata, PA.  She was born in 1869 – 148 years ago.  There’s no information on when she died.  So this quilt is probably at least 100 years old.  Love these family keepsakes!

The backing and the binding are unbleached muslin.  I’ve always been fond of the backs of quilts.

I am a first generation quilter – no vintage tops or quilts in my family.  I was lucky enough to purchase some vintage quilts that belonged to my great aunt.  I blogged about them years ago – if I can find it I’ll post it again.

Do you have vintage quilt tops or quilts in your family?  Do you use and enjoy them or are they tucked away?